Photo by Rob Raker

Coyote Conflicts In YOUR Neighborhood?


All Front Range communities are home to coyotes. These clever canids have readily adapted to our food and habitat-rich
environments. The Denver Urban Coyote Project Team in conjunction with Colorado Parks & Wildlife (CPW) want to help you avoid conflicts with coyotes in your neighborhood.  For a detailed pdf version of this information, please visit this site.  In addition, Mary Ann Bonnell has done extensive work educating the public about the proper way to haze coyotes and her recent interview with Colorado Matters Nathan Heffel can be found here.


Why Haze Coyotes?

Aurora Senior Natural Resources Specialist Mary Ann Bonnell retrieved a sign Friday afternoon warning of coyote activity in Horseshoe Park. (Karl Gehring, The Denver Post)

Aurora Senior Natural Resources Specialist Mary Ann Bonnell retrieved a sign Friday afternoon warning of coyote activity in Horseshoe Park. (Karl Gehring, The Denver Post)

Coyotes are similar to dogs in many respects: they are able to decipher patterns and signals from people.  In fact, the coyote's ability to observe and stare at people curiously is one of the contributing factors to latter conflict.  Many people consider the word "hazing" cruel and torture.  Quite the contrary, hazing here refers to several behaviors YOU can perform to keep a coyote at a safe distance.  By doing this - and by encouraging your friends and neighbors to do the same - we can help to reduce the number of conflicts that occur.  As a consequence, we can help to mitigate the issues that often cause concern and panic, simply by following the steps below.


Hazing OR S.A.S.ing a Coyote

A infographic describing the means you can use to stay safe and coexist with coyotes in your neighborhood.

A infographic describing the means you can use to stay safe and coexist with coyotes in your neighborhood.

Rather than using the word "haze", which sometimes can have a negative connotation, consider using this acronym to help you remember what to do when you encounter a coyote:

S.

stand tall and wave your arms back and forth

A.

Always keep your eyes on the coyote, and your surrounding pets

S.

Shout loudly, clap hard, and make as much noise as possible

 

  • The hope is that by S.A.S.ing a coyote, you give a healthy fear and apprehension of people.  In the long run, this will help to keep the coyote safe, and reduce conflict.

Steps to Protect Your Pets

  • Keep pets on a 6-foot leash when walking.
  • Never allow your pets to “play” with a coyote.
  • Pick up small pets if confronted by a coyote.
  • Do what you can to discourage a coyote’s approach— yell, stomp your feet, throw small rocks or sticks at it.
  • Always supervise your pet when outside, especially at dawn and dusk.
  • Never leave cats or dogs outside after dark.
  • If you must leave your pet outside, secure it in a fully enclosed kennel.

Questions or concerns regarding wildlife in your area? Call the CPW at 303-291-7227.


Other Useful Guidelines to Follow

  • Never feed coyotes!
  • Remove attractants from your yard, including pet food, water sources, bird feeders and fallen fruit.
  • Secure trash in a container with a locking lid or put trash out on the morning of pick up.
  • Fully enclose gardens and compost piles.
  • Trim up vegetation to reduce hiding places.
  • Deter coyotes from entering your yard with a 6-foot privacy fence.
  • Work with your neighbors to discourage coyotes in your entire community.
  • If you meet a coyote, make it feel unwelcome by yelling, throwing rocks and sticks at it, spraying it with a hose or a vinegar-filled water gun, or banging pots and pans.

If you have an additional concerns or problems directly with coyotes, please do not hesitate to reach Colorado Parks & Wildlife:

Colorado Parks & Wildlife
Denver Service Center
6060 Broadway
Denver, CO 80216
(303) 291-7227
http://www.cpw.state.co.us